How to clear your DNS cache

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URL: https://support.quadrahosting.com/index.php?_m=knowledgebase&_a=viewarticle&kbarticleid=217
Article ID: 217
Created On: 06 May 2015 09:29 AM

Answer If you have recently re-delegated your domain name to us, changed a DNS record or registered a new domain name and it is not working as expected, you can try clearing the DNS cache on your computer and modem/router with the following instructions:

Windows:
  1. Hold the Windows key and press the r button
  2. Type "cmd" (without quotes) into the Run dialogue box and press enter
  3. In the Command Prompt window that will appear, type in the following: ipconfig/flushdns [press enter]
  4. Restart your modem/router
  5. Re-open your web browser and try again

Mac:

Firstly, determine the version of Mac OS X you have installed by clicking on the on the Apple icon in the top left hand corner and then click on 'About This Mac'. The version number is written below 'os x' and you are just looking for the first two sets of digits such as 10.10.

Snow Leopard (Version 10.6):

  1. Open the Applications folder
  2. Navigate to Utilities and click on Terminal
  3. In the Terminal, type in the following: dsacheutil -flushcache [press enter]
  4. Restart your modem/router
  5. Re-open your web browser and try again

Lion, Mountain Lion and Mavericks (Version 10.7, 10.8 and 10.9):

  1. Open the Applications folder
  2. Navigate to Utilities and click on Terminal
  3. In the Terminal, type in the following: sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder [press enter and type in your Mac user password if prompted]
  4. Restart your modem/router
  5. Re-open your web browser and try again

Yosemite (Version 10.10):

  1. Open the Applications folder
  2. Navigate to Utilities and click on Terminal
  3. In the Terminal, type in the following: sudo discoveryutil udnsflushcaches [press enter and type in your Mac user password if prompted]
  4. Restart your modem/router
  5. Re-open your web browser and try again

Please note that this will not clear any potential DNS caching with your ISP's DNS servers.